Barbara Horlander

Corpse Flower

  Corpse Flower , plywood, Flashe paint, wax, rusted object, 7 x 7 x 6 inches, 2017

Corpse Flower, plywood, Flashe paint, wax, rusted object, 7 x 7 x 6 inches, 2017

Combining a rusted piece of metal with a strategically cut, painted, and worked plywood surface, this piece represents the idea of age and deconstruction from youth and beauty. Amorphophallus titanum is the technical term for the corpse flower. The scientific name comes from the phallic nature of the plant, the layman's term "corpse flower" comes from the smell that the plant emits. As with many flowers, the phallic nature of this piece relates back to the body. This piece is covered in encaustic wax giving the surface a corporeal look, enticing the viewer to touch. 3) Party Favor: This newest piece combines various materials and textures, assembled with a purposefully rough aesthetic. The awkward clash of soft fur with roughly cut wood, pattern on pattern, and seemingly random color choices make for a visual party for the viewer's eye. The artist's hand is visible in this newest work as is the idea of high-low aesthetic.

 

Stabbed

  Stabbed , plywood, Flashe paint, beeswax, rusted scissors, 11 ½ x 5 x 5 inches, 2016

Stabbed, plywood, Flashe paint, beeswax, rusted scissors, 11 ½ x 5 x 5 inches, 2016

Combining rusted scissors with a strategically cut, painted, and worked plywood surface, this piece creates a shelf for the object to penetrate. Feminine paint colors and playful scalloped edges compete with the violent act of the scissors stabbing the wood. Encaustic wax highlights the edges of the plywood to enhance the texture and pattern in the wood, bringing attention to the materials. There is a struggle between the sweetness and suggested rage within this piece.

Party Favor

  Party Favor , plywood, faux fur, Flashe paint, nail polish, texture medium, 8 x 6 x 5 inches, 2017

Party Favor, plywood, faux fur, Flashe paint, nail polish, texture medium, 8 x 6 x 5 inches, 2017

Biography

Barbara Horlander is currently a Master of Fine Arts candidate in Painting at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. In 2015 she received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis, Indiana, where she graduated with highest distinction. In 1988 she received a Bachelor of Arts in Fine Art at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California.

Her latest work reflects her interest in materials, building, and the theme of finding beauty in imperfection. The artist selects materials for their formal qualities and the cultural associations they conjure, such as fetishism and bygone eras of handicraft or machine culture. Combining materials such as fur, leather, and plywood, reveals textures that titillate the senses and provoke in the viewer a desire for a haptic experience of the object. This exchange of time and unspoken conversation rouses a relationship between maker and beholder.